Showing posts with label DIY. Show all posts

Keeping Schedules Organized For Back-To-School

This shop has been compensated by Collective Bias, Inc. and its advertiser. All opinions are mine alone. #PowerToThePen #PilotYourLife #CollectiveBias

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With back-to-school time coming up in just two more weeks for our family, I've been trying to figure out all the best ways to keep all the schedules organized for the busy school year ahead of us. Between school, church responsibilities, doctor appointments, after school sports and more, it's easy to feel like something can get lost in the shuffle. If you're in need of some school organization tips, I've got you covered.

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When I was doing my back-to-school shopping at Target this year, I bought an assorted pack of G2® pens by Pilot Pen, so that I could make an organized family calendar in our kitchen. I love G2® pens by Pilot Pen because they are the smoothes gel ink pens that I've ever used, and they've been a long time favorite of mine since high school... and for good reason since they're the number one selling gel ink brand in America, and on the top of everyone's school supply list.

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For this project, I simply bought a large calendar for my kitchen wall and then assigned each family member they're own color ink with my G2® pens by Pilot Pen. Once everyone was assigned a color I then went through my planner and transferred everything on our calendar to the large one. I love having everything color coded by person, since I know where everyone needs to be and when. You could also do this with dry erase markers and a white board as well for your own home command center.

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I realized that between my own work projects on the blog, my church responsibilities, and my own assignments for my last year of college I'll be starting soon, I had a lot going on and was actually able to assign myself several different colors of ink so I could keep everything balanced and in order for myself. I love that that quality of Pilot Pen products is the same throughout their entire color range so that I don't have to worry about ink skipping, or smearing when I write, and that everything looks clean and orderly when I'm done.

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Once I finished writing in all our upcoming events, we simply hung our new calendar on the wall, right by our garage door, so now everyone sees it when they leave for the day. I've found that it's a great way for us as a family to stay up-to-date on what's going on in everyone's lives and so that there aren't any surprises with a last minute practice or work project that someone forgot about.

I'm really excited to get some hooks for underneath our calendar to hang lunch boxes, and maybe even a bulletin board to pin noted from school and permission slips as well. The idea is to make this a central point so that when kids come home from school, they can unload everything here, while still keeping our home organized during the school season.

Right now when you purchase your G2® Pens by Pilot Pen at your local Target store, you can get $.75 off your purchase of any four pack or larger. I know all parents are looking to save money for back-to-school, and basically all kids want these pens anyways, so you might as well save yourself some money in the process!

What are some of your school organization ideas? I'd love to hear in the comments!

Basketball Game Fun For Kids With Goldfish

This shop has been compensated by Collective Bias Inc, and its advertiser. All thoughts and opinions are mine alone. #GoldfishGameTime #CollectiveBias


Click on this image to purchase Goldfish crackers at Walmart.
Derek and I don't really love any one major sports season, but basketball is one that we really get into. Each year since we've been together we've gone through the process of filling out a bracket, watching the games, and in more recent years, getting the kids in on the action too. Our preparations always seem to involve a trip to Walmart to stock up on snacks like Pepperidge Farm® Goldfish® crackers for the kids, and anything else we might need to make our viewing experience more enjoyable. The 30 oz. Goldfish crackers are exclusively on rollback for $6.46 at Walmart ( in store only)right now!


Sometimes watching a basketball game isn't as fun for the kids as it is for the adults, which is why I love to make sure we have snack on hand and other fun activities to make sure that they're having just as much fun as mom and dad are.


I feel like I'm much more inclined to be a fun mom for the kids if I can make a fun little game for them to play with at home, if I already have all the supplies on hand (or can easily be grabbed at Walmart). For this fun basketball game, I used some items we had around the house (cardboard box, scissors, tape, construction paper, online printable etc...) to make a mini basketball court that the kids could play with to shoot some hoops with Goldfish crackers. Goldfish crackers have been a long term parenting staple that we keep on hand at all times, and they're fun orange color makes them perfect for basketball season. You can never go wrong with Goldfish crackers Cheddar but we also really love having the Whole Grain variety in the house as well!


Basketball Court Construction Instructions:
Supplies:
1 Disposable Cup
Construction Paper
Small Box
Kabob Sticks
Backboard Printable, Available Here
Tape


Directions:
Start off by covering your small box with the construction paper. Once covered, stick the two kabob sticks down into the box, and then tape your backboard printable to the sticks. Cut off the rim of the the disposable cup, and tape onto the backboard to use as a rim, and then bust out the Goldfish crackers to see how many points your kids can get before halftime!




Do you love making fun projects like this with your kids? I'd love to hear your ideas in the comments below! Be sure to head on over to Walmart before game day to pick up all your basketball season needs, and some Goldfish crackers to make this fun project with your kids! Need more inspiration? Visit this website for more games!

DIY Diaper Clutch

This shop has been compensated by Collective Bias Inc, and it's advertiser, all thoughts and opinions are my own. #NothingLikeAHug #CollectiveBias

The holiday season is right around the corner, which means we're going to be doing a lot of traveling in the car the next few months. We'll be heading four hours north to Idaho for Thanksgiving and Christmas, and then down to Southern Utah for a few days in Late December for a wedding. We're still in the diapering phase of life right now, and the last few weeks we've found ourselves without a diaper at the wrong time. I sewed this diaper clutch a couple days ago to leave in the car at all times, so we don't have to be caught without a diaper at the wrong time during the busy holiday season. 

Our diapers of choice lately have been the Huggies Little Movers. I love them because now that Em is crawling and moving more and more, I love that they stay in place and keep everything in place during playtime. I'm also a huge fan on the Huggies One and Done Natural Care wipes. They come in convenient travel packs, are thick enough to get messes cleaned fast, and they're the #1 branded baby wipe. 

Hover over this photo to shop the products!

I've been a long time fan of Sam's Club, so they're our number one diaper retailer of choice. I love that I can order everything I need online with the Sam's Club Pick-up service, and then show up to the club and get my order brought out to me. Right now when you purchase two Huggies items at Sam's Club, you can get an additional $8 off their already low prices now through 11/22/17. You can also get an additional $4 rebate when you submit your purchase through Ibotta.

Supplies:
(2) 1/4 yard fabric in two separate prints
sewing machine
thread
pins
Pattern (Found here at Crafty Little Projects)

Directions: 
Print your patter pieces. You need two copies of the large piece and one copy of the smaller piece. Cut and tape one of those larger pieces to the flap piece to form the back piece, and the other piece is your front.

Fold your fabric and lay the pattern on the fold so that the straight edge is on the folded part. Cut one front piece and one back piece in each fabric for a total of four pieces.

Now put right sides together and sew them together around the sides and the bottom.

Now turn your inside fabric right side out and stick it down into the outside fabric, so that right sides are touching.


Flip your fabric over and begin sewing the two pieces of the flap where shown in this photo.

Sew down that side until you get to the part where the front and back piece join across the middle. Sew across those two making sure that you are only sewing the front of the bag and not the back. (So you should be sewing 2 pieces of fabric, not 4.) Then sew across the middle and up the other side. This is what it looks like in the sewing machine. 

Once it comes out of the machine, pull the inside out through the opening in the top. Pull out the inner fabric, and then the outer. Then put the inside fabric back into the outside fabric, and then straighten out the corners and press down the sides. 





Fold the top opening under itself, and then stitch it shut. 



Once everything the top part is sewn, your clutch is ready to be used. You can add velcro or a button to keep it closed if needed. 

What is one way that you're prepping for all the busy holidays and traveling in the months ahead? I love stocking up for all my diapers and wipes now at Sam's Club so it's one less thing I have to worry about later. Be sure to take advantage of the $8 off instant rebate and $4 Ibotta offer until 11/22/17!

Halloween Glow Stick Gifts

Em's classroom is having a Halloween party next week, and of course we were told to bring a treat or toy to share with the class. I have enough anxiety worrying about whether or not I'm poisoning a typical child with some sort of food allergy or aversion, so a classroom with 9 special needs kids? I wasn't taking any chances. We went the toy route for sure. 


I was at Target today with the kids after school and found these three packs of glow sticks there for $1 and figured I could find a little printable on Pinterest to go with them, and then tie it on with some bakers twine, and call it good. 

When browsing pinterest I found Lady bug Teacher Files blog, and her super cute Halloween printable. It says, "A bit of light, for Halloween night!" Super cute and simple. The hardest part about this craft was waiting for the paper to come out of my deathly slow printer. And it was fun to have my little helper with me to cut out circles, and of course help with photographing the end results!  


What fun gifts are you making for Halloween this year? 

DIY Bath Bombs

If there is one thing to know about me, it's that I love taking baths. When we lived in North Carolina and had a large master bathroom, I took a bath at least three times a week. Then when we moved to Georgia, we only had one bathroom that we had to share with the kids, and the tub was very unimpressive. Think, 1950s split level home, with the tub from the 1950s. Still surprised we all left that house without any skin fungi. 


When we were house hunting I kept my fingers crossed that we would be able to get a house with a large master bathroom tub again. Luckily we were able to pull that off, and since we've moved, I think that I might be at a solid 1:1 ratio of baths versus showers. 

Most nights when I take a bath it's usually just warm water, nothing too fancy, but I really love being able to use bubble bath, Epsom salts, or bath bombs when possible. I've never bought anything from Lush before, because while everything seems amazing, spending $10 on something that will last one bath just doesn't seem like a smart financial decision. I saw a video last year on how to make bath bombs on your own, and decided to pull the trigger and give it a try for myself. They were surprisingly super easy, and  I love how you can customize them with scents, and colors to fit your personal preference. 

Ingredients:
Yields about three bath bombs
1 c baking soda
1/2 c citric acid
1/2 c corn starch
1/2 c Epsom salt
3/4 tsp water
2 tsp essential oil 
1 tsp coconut oil
food coloring (optional)
circle mold (I got one at Michael's for $1)

Directions:
In a large bowl, mix together all the dry ingredients. In a small dish, stir together all your wet ingredients, and add food coloring if desired, and then mix into the dry ingredients. You want the mixture to be slightly dry, but wet enough to mold and shape together in your hands. 

To make the bath bombs, fill one half of your molds, and then fill the other half, and then add a little more to the second half so that it's overflowing, and then press the two molds together and squeeze tight for a minute. Then open the mold, and lay the bath bomb on a fluffy towel. 

If your bath bomb does not come out in one ball when you open the mold, pour the mixture back into the bowl, and add more water, a teaspoon at a time, until you get the right consistency. (You can see a video of them being made here)

Once your bath bombs are made, lay them to dry and harden for 24 hours before using, and moving to another location. 

The Powder Bathroom| How to Make Industrial Floating Shelves

This shop has been compensated by Collective Bias Inc, and it's advertiser, all thoughts and opinions are my own. #GetUnderTheRim #CollectiveBias

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We've been making a lot of solid progress in our house over the last few months. I never would have thought when we moved in June that we would have four rooms completely done by now, but here we are. I should elaborate that when I say, "completely done" I mostly mean paint and home decor, because I would love for lots of new big ticket items, but that's not exactly in the budget right now. I really have loved doing small projects in each room though that really seem to make a big difference. So far we've finished the kitchen, living room, master bedroom, and Kyle's Bedroom with lots of fun DIY projects.


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Our house has two and a half bathrooms. One bathroom that Jay and Em use near their bedrooms, our master bathroom, and then this small powder room downstairs off of our school room. This is easily the least used bathroom in the house because it's down eight stairs, and tucked away into another room. When guests come over, they usually use Jay and Em's bathroom because they only have to go up five stairs to get there, and it's just a lot more accessible.

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We've actually thought about just ripping this bathroom out, and turning it into a closet so that our school room could be considered a fourth bedroom in our house (which either way, if we have another baby, it will be the fourth bedroom), but then we'd have to pay taxes on the square footage in the downstairs of our house, and right now we don't and the county basically recognizes this space, the school room, and laundry room as non-existent, so it's in the better interest of our wallet to leave it as is.

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The previous owners of the house had already refinished the vanity, and changed the lighting in this room, so the only things Derek and I had to do were add a toilet paper holder, a towel ring, and a wood industrial shelving unit for added storage space, and it came together really fast.



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Since this bathroom doesn't get a lot of traffic, it really doesn't need to be cleaned that often. I love that I can leave Scotch-Brite's New Disposable Toilet Scrubber and Refills that I bought at Target downstairs in the bathroom, and then head down five minutes before guest arrive to give it a quick clean. I love that you can just put a new sponge head onto the wand (that's also angled nicely so you can get that hard to reach area under the rim), and that all the cleaning product you need is on there. Once you're done cleaning, you just push a button, the wand releases the sponge, and throw it away. The less I actually have to touch my toilet when cleaning, the better.

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My favorite thing about this bathroom, aside from the ease of cleaning, would definitely be these DIY industrial pipe shelves. I've seen these floating around on pinterest and knew they would be a perfect addition to that bare spot above our toilet. The only prep work that needed to be done ahead of time was spray painting the metal pipes and fittings, staining the wood, letting them dry overnight, and then the next morning everything was set to be hung!

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The industrial pipe shelf look is super easy to replicate. I love how our top shelf turned out with all the decor. These wood shelves really add a fun touch with the galvanized pipe bracket.

DIY industrial pipe shelves step by step tutorial. DIY pipe shelves freestanding. How much weight can pipe shelves hold. Pipe shelves Home Depot. DIY industrial wall shelf. Galvanized pipe shelves. Iron pipe shelf. DIY shelves.

DIY industrial pipe shelves step by step tutorial. DIY pipe shelves freestanding. How much weight can pipe shelves hold. Pipe shelves Home Depot. DIY industrial wall shelf. Galvanized pipe shelves. Iron pipe shelf. DIY shelves.






Supplies:
Makes One Shelf
(2) 3/4in X 10in Black Steel Nipple
(2) 3/4in Black Iron Cap
(2) 3/4in Black Malleable Iron FPT Floor Flange
2in x 10in x 8ft cut to size
Wood Stain of Choice
Black Matte Spray Paint
Level
Drill
Wall Anchors
Screws

Directions:
Go to your the home depot and collect all the supplies. If you don't have a saw at home, make sure that you have the people at the hardware store cut your wood for you. Our shelves are each 2ft long, but yours will be whatever you decide is appropriate for your space.

Using an old rag, dip the rag into the stain, and then rub it into your piece of wood on all sides. You'll want to make sure you get the bottoms and sides of the boards since you'll be able to see the bottoms once they're installed.

Once your boards are stained, you can then spray paint your metal fixtures. I stood the pipes up on their end so that I could easily spray all around them, and then sprayed the flanges and caps as well.

Once everything is dry, screw one end of the pipe into the flange, and then screw the cap onto the other end of the flange.

When you have everything painted, and the pipes screwed together, decide where everything will go into the walls by measuring where you want everything, and then holding the flange part of the pipe onto the wall, mark with a pencil where the four holes are, and then with your drill, drill each of the holes.Then hammer a wall anchor into each hole. Secure the flange into the wall with the screws that come with your wall anchors, repeat on the other side, and then simply place your board on-top of the two pipes. Repeat this for the top and bottom shelf.

Have you tried Scotch-Brite's new Disposable Toilet Scrubbers at Target? Be sure to check your packages for the $2 off coupon and the 15% off cartwheel coupon available 11/6/16-11/12/16!

Easy No-Sew Crayon Halloween Costume

This shop has been compensated by Collective Bias Inc, and it's advertiser. All thoughts and opinions are my own. #ScotchClothingEssentials #CollectiveBias

When we were in North Carolina, I had gotten a sewing machine for Christmas one year, and actually learned how to sew pretty well. I mean, I wasn't going to be the next Merrick White or anything, but if something needed to be hemmed or mended, I could typically get it done with ease. When we made our move to Georgia, I got rid of our sewing machine, which means any clothing projects I've wanted to do over the last year and a half, have been pushed to the side since I don't have a machine to do them on. 

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I wanted to make a simple Halloween costume for Jay this year, and despite not having a sewing machine I was able to make this crayon costume with the help of the Scotch™ Essentials Permanent Hem Bonding Strips. For this crayon costume, I bought some felt (and the strips), from Walmart, and then used the strips to adhere the letters, and the hems of the costume together. 3M has a lot of different clothing products like their pill remover (which you'll need now that it's fall, and your sweaters will become fuzzy balls of death), and other hem tapes, and even white mark erasers, that you can all get at Walmart. 

We tried making these crayon costumes a couple years ago, but failed. I tried hot gluing everything together, and then when that failed, I went to run in through the sewing machine, and the glue was hard, broke my needle, and then I went to the store and bought a normal Halloween costume because it was the night of Halloween and everything was a mess. Luckily, I've worked out all the kinks, and now you can make a crayon costume too!


Crayon box costume DIY. Crayola Stencil for costume. DIY Crayon hat template. DIY crayon costume with tutu. DIY crayon costume Shirt. Crayon hat printable. Crayon tip hat template. Baby crayon costume.


Crayon box costume DIY. Crayola Stencil for costume. DIY Crayon hat template. DIY crayon costume with tutu. DIY crayon costume Shirt. Crayon hat printable. Crayon tip hat template. Baby crayon costume.





Supplies:
Colored felt (to use as the base of the crayon)
Black felt (for the stripes and the oval in the middle)
Letter cut-outs
scissors
Permanent marker

Directions:  
Go to dafont.com, and download the motor oil font. Then open a word document and write out "Crayon", adjusting the font size to how big you want it for your costume. When you have it set to the right size print it out, and then cut the letters out. Trace the letters right side facing down onto the felt, and then carefully cut out your letters on the felt. 

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Cut out a large oval from the black felt, making sure that you have enough so that you can spell out "crayon" on there, and have enough room. 

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Determine how much felt you need for the base of your costume by measuring the person who will be wearing it. Once you have the length and width determined, cut a hole for the neck, and then measure down a few inches, and then pin an opening for the arms. Once the arms holes are pinned open, line up the desired amount of Scotch™ Essentials Permanent Hem Bonding Strips, and use them to seal the hem for the rest of the costume. When you have your hems sealed, turn the costume inside out so that you don't see the raw edges of the hem. 

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Crayon box costume DIY. Crayola Stencil for costume. DIY Crayon hat template. DIY crayon costume with tutu. DIY crayon costume Shirt. Crayon hat printable. Crayon tip hat template. Baby crayon costume.

On the back of your black oval, attach four more hem bonding strips (one on each side), and adhere that to the middle of the base of your costume. Then cut the hem boding strips into smaller pieces to fit onto the letters, and then attach them to the black oval on your costume. Then cut two long black strips for the stripes on your costume, attach one to the top and one to the bottom, and you're done!


Crayon box costume DIY. Crayola Stencil for costume. DIY Crayon hat template. DIY crayon costume with tutu. DIY crayon costume Shirt. Crayon hat printable. Crayon tip hat template. Baby crayon costume.

I love how easy it was to make this costume, and how anyone can make this costume since a sewing machine isn't required. What fun costumes can you think of making with the Scotch™ Essentials Permanent Hem Bonding Strips?

Homemade Playdough Recipe

I used to be that mom that hated playdough. Then one year for Jay's birthday I found myself telling my sister-in-law to get him some, and he loved it. All my fears of it making a mess, and being a pain to clean up when he was done came true, but it brought Jay happiness, so it's fine. Messes and motherhood go hand in hand right? All of that playdough has since gotten hard and been thrown in the trash. 

Then, last weekend when we were watching LDS General Conference, I wanted something to keep Jay and Em busy, and so I decided to make some more playdough for them. This was more of me not wanting to go to the store, and less of me being an earthy crunchy mom. But I always feel like a good person when I'm able to have those "organic" mommy wins. 

This playdough turned out to be incredibly soft, and I like the feel of it in my hands better than the stuff you get from the store. We used gel food coloring to make it different colors, and I was surprised that after the colors were well blended into the dough, it didn't dye the hands of my kids at all. I was also surprised by how soft this stays in airtight containers. It's lasted us over a week now with no changes in texture. When you first mix the dough it feels a little rough and crumbly, but softens and smooths out as you continue to knead it. 







Ingredients:
2 cups flour
1/2 cup salt
2 tbsp oil
2 tbsp cream of tartar
1 1/2 cups boiling water
gel food coloring

Directions
In a large bowl, mix together all the ingredients with a large spoon (so you don't burn your hands on the hot water), and mix all the ingredients together until the dough forms and everything is mixed together evenly. Place the dough into a new bowl, cover it with plastic wrap, and let it cool in the freezer for about 10 minutes. 

Once the dough is cool enough to handle, divide the dough into four even balls. Using a plate (so you don't stain the counter), place one ball of dough on the plate, and make an indent for the food coloring. I just did a small blob that I thought would be enough to cover, so do what you think is best. Knead the ball of dough on the plate until the color is uniform throughout the dough. Repeat this process until you've colored all your dough. Store in airtight containers for up to one month. 

How to Make Your Own Large Picture Frame

One thing I've learned since owning a home is that everything costs a lot more than you thought it would. As we've begun the decorating/remodeling process in our home, we've tried to do as much of it on our own as possible to save money. Luckily, Derek built log cabins in southeast Idaho after high school to help pay for his church service mission in France, so he's pretty handy and is able to fulfill most of the handy man tasks I ask of him.


When I got some engineer size prints in the mail last week, I knew I wanted to get frames to go around them, and then almost peed my pants when I found out frames that size would cost hundreds of dollars. Considering we had three large prints to frame, coughing out upwards of a thousand dollars wasn't exactly an option. Would I buy frames for a really expensive piece of art? Yes. For digital prints that I bought off Etsy? Absolutely not. 

I then had the idea to just make the frames myself, and after a quick google search, I realized they weren't hard at all. The tutorial that I based my project off of can be found here, but I decided to simplify our frames even more by not putting them under glass, and decided to just tape my picture to the back of the frame. 

I will say that the wood we bought from Home Depot was not the greatest quality of wood out there, but each 8' board was only $1.25. Definitely dig around to find the straightest pieces in the batch that they have. Some of ours had split parts, or parts that looked pretty roughed up, but we spray painted them anyway, and loved the "rustic" look that it gave. 

Supplies: 
supplies make one 4'x3' frame
(2) 1"x 3" x 8' KD Premium boards from Home Depot
(1) 4 Pack 2 1/2" Flat Corner Braces
Sawtooth Hangers (for hanging if needed)
Wood Glue
Miter Box w/ Saw
Spray Paint



Directions:
Measure your boards out for the length and width that you need. We were doing 4'x3' frames, and so we needed two pieces of wood to complete one frame. Once you have your measurements marked, place your wood into the miter box, and at a 45° angle, and cut your wood on the marks.



Once you've made all your cuts, lay them out on the ground to make sure they fit together, and that you don't need to correct or fix anything. When your boards are where you want them, wood glue all the seams together, and then screw your flat corner brackets into place. We didn't pre-drill holes for the screws that hold the brackets in place, and did not personally have any splitting on all three frames.



Once all your corner brackets are screwed in place, then spray paint your frame to the color of your choice, and let dry for the allotted time that it states on your paint can.


Once your frames are painted and dried, tape your picture to the back of the frame. If you're going to be hanging this on a wall, be sure to add the sawtooth hanger after the paint dries, or if it's just sitting on your mantle, stick it up there, and be done!


Have you ever made your own picture frames before? Do you love large engineer size prints? I have a feeling these are going to be staples in my house all year long.