Easy No-Sew Crayon Halloween Costume

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When we were in North Carolina, I had gotten a sewing machine for Christmas one year, and actually learned how to sew pretty well. I mean, I wasn't going to be the next Merrick White or anything, but if something needed to be hemmed or mended, I could typically get it done with ease. When we made our move to Georgia, I got rid of our sewing machine, which means any clothing projects I've wanted to do over the last year and a half, have been pushed to the side since I don't have a machine to do them on. 

I wanted to make a simple Halloween costume for Jay this year, and despite not having a sewing machine I was able to make this crayon costume with the help of the Scotch™ Essentials Permanent Hem Bonding Strips. For this crayon costume, I bought some felt (and the strips), from Walmart, and then used the strips to adhere the letters, and the hems of the costume together. 3M has a lot of different clothing products like their pill remover (which you'll need now that it's fall, and your sweaters will become fuzzy balls of death), and other hem tapes, and even white mark erasers, that you can all get at Walmart. 

We tried making these crayon costumes a couple years ago, but failed. I tried hot gluing everything together, and then when that failed, I went to run in through the sewing machine, and the glue was hard, broke my needle, and then I went to the store and bought a normal Halloween costume because it was the night of Halloween and everything was a mess. Luckily, I've worked out all the kinks, and now you can make a crayon costume too!








Supplies:
Colored felt (to use as the base of the crayon)
Black felt (for the stripes and the oval in the middle)
Letter cut-outs
scissors
Permanent marker

Directions:  
Go to dafont.com, and download the motor oil font. Then open a word document and write out "Crayon", adjusting the font size to how big you want it for your costume. When you have it set to the right size print it out, and then cut the letters out. Trace the letters right side facing down onto the felt, and then carefully cut out your letters on the felt. 



Cut out a large oval from the black felt, making sure that you have enough so that you can spell out "crayon" on there, and have enough room. 


Determine how much felt you need for the base of your costume by measuring the person who will be wearing it. Once you have the length and width determined, cut a hole for the neck, and then measure down a few inches, and then pin an opening for the arms. Once the arms holes are pinned open, line up the desired amount of Scotch™ Essentials Permanent Hem Bonding Strips, and use them to seal the hem for the rest of the costume. When you have your hems sealed, turn the costume inside out so that you don't see the raw edges of the hem. 



On the back of your black oval, attach four more hem bonding strips (one on each side), and adhere that to the middle of the base of your costume. Then cut the hem boding strips into smaller pieces to fit onto the letters, and then attach them to the black oval on your costume. Then cut two long black strips for the stripes on your costume, attach one to the top and one to the bottom, and you're done!


I love how easy it was to make this costume, and how anyone can make this costume since a sewing machine isn't required. What fun costumes can you think of making with the Scotch™ Essentials Permanent Hem Bonding Strips?

5 comments

  1. You are a wizard with those Scotch™ Essentials Permanent Hem Bonding Strips! That adorable crayon costume is a perfect DIY for Halloween. #client

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  2. Such a cute and easy costume, you did a great job!

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  3. So extremely adorable! look marvelous! You made an extraordinary showing with regards

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  4. I admire people who make such things by themselves. When I enter the stores with goods for sewing I even don't know what to do with them. When I was at school and was asked to make some clothing during labor lessons I always asked my mam to do my homework for me .

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